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dc.contributor.advisorSteffgen, Georges
dc.contributor.authorBurbergs, Maris
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T07:23:38Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T07:23:38Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11825/1392
dc.descriptionSecond semester University: Université du Luxembourg.en_US
dc.description.abstractViolence-containing onscreen games (also called “video”, “computer” or “digital” games) are claimed to be the cause of such events as school-shootings. In the light of attempts to create society where all actors involved respect human rights – “human rights culture” – these heinous events provoke a question whether the violence-containing onscreen games could be an obstacle to this culture? This question is of vital actuality, as the popularity of these games is growing every year and playing them can be considered to be routine to a great part of adolescents – the next generation that will be in charge of securing human rights. Violence-containing onscreen games are receiving sturdy condemnation, banning and trials from societies that have faced the school-shootings. But, awoken by these activities, additional inputs should be made to broaden the view and see the effects on the cherished human rights culture. Involvement of scientific disciplines to examine the issue is the starting point for grounded statements and decisions. And thus, philosophy of human rights culture, psychological effects of violence-containing onscreen games, political opinions and juridical argumentations are to be examined.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEMA theses 2006/2007;18
dc.subjectcomputer gamesen_US
dc.subjecthuman rights violationsen_US
dc.subjectinterneten_US
dc.titlePlaying human rights violationsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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