The impact of securitisation on marginalised groups in the Asia Pacific: Humanising the threats to security in cases from the Philippines, Indonesia and China

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Date
2017-12
Authors
Kim, Eunha
Dinco, Jean
Suamen, Louise
Hayes, Mike
Papsch, Tilman
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Global Campus
Abstract
Securitisation has a disproportionate impact on marginalised groups. This article examines the impact of securitisation on four groups of people: the poor and children in Duterte’s ‘war on drugs’ in the Philippines; female North Korean refugees in China; and the LGBTI community in Indonesia. The article argues that the term ‘security threats,’ as used by Buzan, does not adequately describe the consequences of securitisation. The term ‘human threats’ is more suitable as it demonstrates that state securitisation impacts humans and their rights, and that the existential threats have real-life consequences. This is demonstrated in the case studies. First, the war on drugs in the Philippines has been killing the poor and detaining children rather than eliminating drugs. The securitisation of China’s border with North Korea results in many women becoming victims of trafficking, forced marriage and other forms of genderbased violence. Religious groups consider LGBTI communities a threat to national security and, as a result, their personal security and access to government services (such as education) is threatened. Key words: securitisation; war on drugs; age of criminal responsibility; North Korean refugees; LGBTI rights in Indonesia
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Keywords
social security, drug control, drug prevention, refugees, criminal liability, children, juvenile detention, Asia Pacific region, North Korea, homosexuality, transgender, intersexuality, Indonesia, gender, Philippines, China
Citation
E Kim, J Dinco, L Suamen, M Hayes & T Papsch ‘The impact of securitisation on marginalised groups in the Asia Pacific: Humanising the threats to security in cases from the Philippines, Indonesia and China’ (2017) 1 Global Campus Human Rights Journal 414 https://doi.org/20.500.11825/421
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