Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorFinlay, Graham
dc.contributor.authorRepetto, Elettra
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-08T10:59:39Z
dc.date.available2017-09-08T10:59:39Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.otherhttp://dx.medra.org/10.7404/eiuc.ema.20142015.04
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/20.500.11825/228
dc.descriptionSecond semester University: University College Dublin - National University of Irelanden_US
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this thesis is to analyse the concept of civil disobedience and to give a justification for it, to finally assess whether or not it is possible to claim that there is a duty to disobey. The initial focus will be on the definition of the concept of civil disobedience itself, to move then to the actors involved, from social movements, to non-governmental organisations, and power holders, and show how the nation-state is not the only entity that counts in the political sphere, nowadays. I will then question the idea of a non-violent civil disobedience, to include violence in the definition of it, maintaining however the difference between civil disobedience and revolution. Afterwards, I will consider the concept of responsibility and the reasons of the dissenters, before turning to Internet as the new space where new actors, such as Anonymous and the whistle-blowers, make a more pluralistic politics. So, I will justify civil disobedience on the basis of democracy as an inclusive system, and on the respect that the institutions should have for our moral agency. I will consequently derive from this the idea that dissenters should be punished in a more clement way than common criminals. Finally, I will conclude by arguing that, under certain circumstances, we might have a duty to disrespect the law. I will base this claim on the fact that, to be full individuals, we have to be political individuals, ready to act.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEIUCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEuropean Master’s Degree in Human Rights and Democratisation, EIUC. Awarded Theses 2014/2015;
dc.subjectcivil disobedienceen_US
dc.subjectinterneten_US
dc.subjectmediaen_US
dc.subjectsocial movementsen_US
dc.subjectNGOsen_US
dc.subjectsocial networksen_US
dc.subjectpoliticsen_US
dc.titleDuty to disobey? A perspective on the new civil disobedience, between international actors and digital mediaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record