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dc.contributor.advisorNowak, Karol
dc.contributor.authorGómez del Valle Ruiz, Álvaro
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-29T13:46:51Z
dc.date.available2019-10-29T13:46:51Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/20.500.11825/1091
dc.descriptionSecond semester University: Lund University. Awarded thesis 2018/2019en_US
dc.description.abstractAs China re-emerges in the world stage as a great power, fuelled by intertwined ethno-nationalism and a sense of manifest destiny with roots on its identity as a civilizational state, it is increasingly seeking to reshape the international liberal order that was put in place by the US-led West after the Second World War. Its emergence as a normative power in the field of human rights, prioritizing national sovereignty and economic development over notions of universalism and civil and political rights has been noticed, and a growing number of political leaders have started to see the unique brand of Chinese authoritarianism and “human rights with Chinese characteristics” as models to emulate. Nowhere can this be seen more clearly than in Southeast Asia, a region with deep historical and economic ties with China, where no one has forgotten the time when Beijing was the centre of the world.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesGlobal Campus Europe (EMA) theses 2018/2019;
dc.relation.hasversionGlobal Campus Europe-EMA awarded thesis 2017/2018: https://doi.org/20.500.11825/1296
dc.subjecthuman rightsen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectSouth Eastern Asiaen_US
dc.subjectauthoritarianismen_US
dc.subjectsovereignityen_US
dc.title“A community of shared destiny” : how China is reshaping human rights in Southeast Asiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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